EQ – New Daimler Brand for Electric Vehicles

EQThe Paris Motor Show seemingly went all-out electric: There hadn’t been so many electric vehicles at one single trade show for a long time. From Oct. 1 to 16, 2016, Opel showcased its Ampera-e (500-kilometer or close to 311-mile range; priced at EUR 39,000), the “currently hottest rod from Germany,” as car blogger Fabian Messner put it. Renault showed the Zoe with a large 41 kWh battery. And VW announced a battery storage unit for its e-Golf with an increased capacity.

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More Windgas, Fewer Climate Troubles

Sönke Tangermann, © Enver Hirsch

Scientific studies have shown that if we want to succeed in transforming the energy market, our priority needs to be long-term storage solutions and an integration of relevant sectors. One technology with much promise for the future is Windgas. But although P2G remains crucial to Germany’s success in meeting the COP21 targets agreed to in Paris, the federal government all but ignores it. The most recent example of the lack of awareness among policy-makers is the 2017 amendment to the EEG, Germany’s renewable energy law, from which gas produced by wind and solar is virtually absent.

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FuelCell Energy: Stock Price Gets Cosmetic Changes

Fuel cell power plant, © FuelCell Energy

To free FuelCell Energy from the shackles of “penny stock life,” the company based in Danbury, Connecticut, took the radical step of merging its shares (reversal stock split) at a ratio of 12:1, effective from Dec. 4, 2015 (see graph). Considering the organization’s more than 300 million outstanding shares (more to say, 475 million fully diluted ones, and 40 million after the split), this move was to be expected: The company was running the risk of being dropped from Nasdaq

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It is Time to Act – Thoughts on the German Strategy

Dear Reader, I would like to present you with some short number examples: The German Callux program installed 474 fuel-cell heating systems within eight years; the original target was 800. Japan currently has over 140,000 of these systems. The German 50 Filling Station program was supposed to set up 50 H2 filling stations until the end of 2015. In the end, there were only 19. Until the middle of 2016, another 23 are said to be added. Meanwhile, Japan has already had 80 of these stations in operation (On a side note, the CEP predecessor, the Verkehrswirtschaftliche Energiestrategie, had envisioned 2,000 public H2 filling stations until 2010).

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