Chemnitz becomes H2-Centre

The Saxon city of Chemnitz is increasingly developing into a Mecca for hydrogen enthusiasts. On July 17, 2019, the Technical University there and the company Continental Powertrain will open a new H2 laboratory
Prof. von Unwerth explains the new test bench, © TU Chemnitz, Jaccob Müller

The Saxon city of Chemnitz is increasingly developing into a Mecca for hydrogen enthusiasts. On July 17, 2019, the Technical University there and the company Continental Powertrain will open a new H2 laboratory equipped with a test rig for researching modern fuel cell vehicle systems.

Read more

Bonhoff switches to politics

The Managing Director of the National Organisation for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology GmbH, Dr. Klaus Bonhoff, will leave NOW and will in future be head of the Policy Department at the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI).
Dr. Klaus Bonhoff

The Managing Director of the National Organisation for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology GmbH, Dr. Klaus Bonhoff, will leave NOW and will in future be head of the Policy Department at the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI). He will thus occupy a central position within the ministry and, according to Minister of Transport Andreas Scheuer, will focus in particular on the “mobility of the future”.

Read more

Austria as hydrogen nation No. 1

On 2 July 2019, Sebastian Kurz, chairman of the new Austrian People's Party (ÖVP), and his party colleague Elisabeth Köstinger jointly presented their climate protection package.

On 2 July 2019, Sebastian Kurz, chairman of the new Austrian People’s Party (ÖVP), and his party colleague Elisabeth Köstinger jointly presented their climate protection package. The goal formulated therein is to make the Alpine republic CO2-neutral by 2045. According to Kurz, hydrogen should play a key role in this process: “This is not only a clean alternative hope for the future in the field of mobility, but also a great opportunity for Austria to become the world’s number one hydrogen nation.

Read more

Hydrogen for aviation

Fuel cell propulsion systems are not only being developed for unmanned aircraft, hydrogen is also increasingly becoming a topic in passenger transport.

In 2018, the Element One project was launched to transport four passengers over distances of 500 to 5,000 km, ©
HES Energy Systems, Singapore

Fuel cell propulsion systems are not only being developed for unmanned aircraft, hydrogen is also increasingly becoming a topic in passenger transport. The US space agency NASA, for example, together with the engineering school of the University of Illinois, is constructing electric aircraft using liquid hydrogen and fuel cells.

Read more

Hydrogen as an export product

Up to now Australia has exported mainly liquid natural gas and coal - in the future also hydrogen
Up to now Australia has exported mainly liquid natural gas and coal – in the future also hydrogen, © BHP Billiton: Coal transport Australia Rail

The city of Perth in southwestern Australia was already one of twelve cities worldwide at the beginning of the 21st century that tested fuel cell buses in local transport. After that, however, the energy-rich country no longer emerged as a major promoter of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. And why should it? After all, the country has huge reserves of fossil fuels, precious metals and rare earth metals. But is that really reason enough not to look for alternatives?

Read more

Iridium could slow down electrolyser run-up

Vulcano plot of different metal oxides for oxygen evolution.
Fig. 1: Vulcano plot of different metal oxides for oxygen evolution, according to [2] © Trasatti S., Electrocatalysis by oxides – attempt at a unifying approach, J. Electroanal. Chem. 1980; 125-131.

Although hydrogen produced from renewable energies has been under discussion for decades as a possible alternative to fossil fuels, it has so far only played a minor role. Recently, however, there have been signs of change, so that “green” hydrogen could gain momentum in the energy sector: More and more powerful electrolysis systems are available, and the prices for these systems are falling. If, however, PEM electrolysers were to be added on a large scale, iridium could become scarce and thus more expensive and thus stand in the way of a reduction in the already considerable investment costs.

Read more